The Romans

StoneageRomanSaxon and NormanMagna Carta Barons


Numerous finds1 of axes and weapons of all three Bronze Age periods have been made in the Thames nearby but the next positive occupation of Wraysbury was by the Romans at O.S. 016 741.  Evidence was also found of Roman sherds in the vicinity of the Neolithic camp suggesting that this are was once again used. CONTENTS

Introduction

Stoneage

Roman

Saxons and Normans

Magna Carta

Barons

Tudor

Manors

Georgian

Victorian

20th century

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Its nearness to Pontes (the bridges), now Staines, indicative of its usage as a river crossing, together with the fact that it lay midway between Londinium, 21 miles east and the Roman garrison town of Silchester, 27 miles west, no doubt made it a favourable spot in which to settle. There seems to have been quite a flourishing Romano-British culture in the Middle Thames in the 2nd century AD, the most favoured sites being along or near the river valleys. 
Coins found in Wraysbury provide evidence of trading activities. Roman cremation remains  were found at O.S. 00 73.  The evidence seems to suggest a fairly well populated and settled rural community.
1These are now housed in Reading Museum.

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